Budweiser Paid Media

By Grace Nesseth

After Budweiser did some research into who their consumers were, they realized that the vast majority was the older generation. In an attempt to reach out to a younger generation, they came up with a new paid media campaign to air as a video on television. Budweiser felt as though they were becoming irrelevant, and they wanted to do something that would throw them in within the pop-culture society; while continuing to be the same fresh taste they’d always been.
The video was originally based off of the short film called, “True” by Charles Stone the third, the film featured friends and their unique greetings. Budweiser took this idea, and created a video of a few African American men sitting on their own couches, talking to each other on the phone. The advertisement focused on the men greeting each other with a “waassssupppp”, and they then talk about how they are just chilling, watching the game with a bud. When the video was first produced and aired, it had a rocky start and not a lot of feedback. They then aired it as a Super Bowl ad in 2000, it quickly gained a lot of traction and feedback from the consumers. After the airing on television, they then put the video onto Youtube. Once the video would finish playing viewers could click on the link to their website where they could learn how to say wassup in over 30 different languages.
Budweiser was able to imitate a real-life situation with their TV ad, adding the value of entertainment to the viewers. This value helps the brand to show that they want their products to provide entertainment, and fun between their friends. Budweiser continues to create advertising that creates a connection between their consumers and them, they continue to stay relevant and make sure that their taglines don’t become overused and old.

http://adage.com/lp/top15/#whassup

(Paid Media, Budweiser, Boys, Games, Hanging Out, Football, Super Bowl, Television)

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